Lunii Hack : Micro-USB to USB-C

The micro-usb port didn’t resist my kids, so they ask me to fix the Lunii (again)

As I had some USB-C port in stock (bought here), it was the perfect occasion to replace the old micro-usb with a brand new USB-C.
Others have done it, so I should be able to 😉

The goal was to be able to charge the Lunii but also to keep the computer connection available, so I had to do some test first.

Original micro-usb

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Removing the micro-usb port was not so easy, and I mess a little bit with the tracks, so I found a connection not so far away.

As my proof-of-concept worked well, I cut a small part of the board to glue the USB-C board and connect it.

The last step was to enlarge the hole for the USB-C port. As I glued it too much on the inside, I had to do a very large hole to accept the hole charger cable.

And the data connection is working ! Mission accomplished 😉

 

Ps: In the repair, I mess with the screen cable.. I have to find a new screen now :-/

Lunii Hack : Improve longevity of the Lunii

My kids have this wonderful radio called Lunii , a “story maker”. That’s great, but the battery is not big enough and I decided to take a look.

The standard battery is a classic 503035 that you can find anywhere on internet for a few euros. It’s a 3,7V – 500mAh battery.

Good for us, it had a big brother, the 103450, a 3,7V – 1800mAh battery. You can also find it easily on internet.

Replacing it was easy (make sure of the polarity of the battery before replacing it, red on red, black on black). I will do a 3d-printed box to maintain it inside the Lunii.

Opening the Lunii by removing 4 screws

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Improving the battery-powered night light of my son

My son have a nice fox night light, that he really need every night. Unfortunately, it needs batteries (3x AAA) and as we forget to switch it off every morning, it’s kind of battery consumming. (Rechargeable battery is not an option)

So I look into my stock of “Let’s keep it, it may be useful someday” and found a perfect 220V transformer !
As I didn’t want to damage the night light, I decided to keep the option to use batteries : I need to make fake batteries.

Adapting new fake batteries

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Cutting the end of the 200V transformer, soldering a screw at the end, and adding an anchor